1. The notion of place is one that can appear deceptively straightforward, as nothing more than a series of spatial and geographic contingencies defined by whatever happens to be there at a particular moment. This is often a considerably striking issue in photography, where the medium not only facilitates superficial readings, but actually affirms the immediacy of such an impression; everything is seemingly left to chance, with no deeper structure at work. The ease with which photography generates surface judgements also encourages the absence of ideological questions in considering the arrangement of our built environments. But the experience of place as such is fundamentally related to (and indeed, actively shaped by) forms of social organisation, both in terms of how its contours are drawn and how the very idea of place, of belonging, determines our identifications.
  2. Contemporary revolutions in photography, from omnipresent digital picture-taking to the advent of hundred-billion image repositories have prompted some practitioners, theorists, and critics to ask whether “photography” (at least as it was once understood) “is over.” I noted that the question has arrived at an ironic time – how could photography be “over” at the exact moment in history that it has achieved an unprecedented ubiquity? The reason is actually fairly obvious – “photography,” as it has been traditionally understood in theory and practice, has undergone a transition – it has become something else, something that’s difficult to make sense of within the existing analytic framework. To me, it seems that to begin charting a course forward, we have to develop an expanded definition of what we mean when we’re talking about “photography.” With a nod to Paul Virilio,[1] I propose a simple definition that has far-reaching consequences: seeing machines.
  3. Hong Kong street art.

  4. I’m sure Google had a similar sentiment in mind when they began their project documenting cities. By using semi-automated cameras designed to capture a 360º view every few metres, Street View is easily viewed as Shore’s ‘Circle #1’ on a massive scale. If you cut forward to today, Street View is now available for cities and regions in 48 different countries. Two years ago (when only 39 countries were available), they listed their data usage at 20 petabytes (20,000 terabytes). The project has covered over 5 million miles of road. It is the most ambitious photography project in history yet we rarely talk about it as such because its sheer breadth makes it unexceptional.
  5. In case you missed it in 2013, here’s a recap of Banksy’s 2013 artist in residency in New York City

  6. There are stylistic trends in art and in literature, and everyone acknowledges them. But rarely are they cited in photojournalism, perhaps because people still cling to the idea of photography as an objective or neutral medium that captures a shared truth. There is nothing remotely objective about photography. Where I stand, how I got to that spot, where I direct my lens, what I frame, how I expose the image, what personal and cultural factors influence these decisions — all are intensely subjective.
  7. Without question, the 21st Century will be a photographic century. Photography will play a more fundamental role in the functioning of 21st Century societies than 20th Century practitioners working with light-sensitive emulsions and photographic papers could have ever dreamed. So while in one sense photography might be “over,” in another, it’s barely gotten going. And we haven’t seen anything yet.
  8. backdooratwork:

2014-04-28 08:14:02

a bit of drama today for this slow moving project

    backdooratwork:

    2014-04-28 08:14:02

    a bit of drama today for this slow moving project

  9. As I sit and listen to the podcast featuring Mr. Roberts Adams, I decided to pile ALL the books I own by, or about him. I have 27 in total. In no particular order they are:-
West From the Columbia 
Turning Back
To Make it Home
Tree line [Hasselblad Award 2009]
Reinventing the West,[with Ansel Adams]
Our Lives Our Children
Notes to Friends
Gone?
Listening to the river
Sunlight Solitude Democracy Home…
Cottonwoods
What Can We Believe Where?*
Los Angeles Spring
Perfect Times Perfect Places
Summer Nights
This Day
I hear the leaves and love the light
The New West
Summer Nights, Walking
From the Missouri West
Commercial Residential [Landscapes Along the Colorado Front Range, 1968-1972]
The Architecture and Art of Early Hispanic Colorado
Denver
Prairie
Why People Photograph
Beauty in Photography, Essays in defence of traditional Values
Along Some Rivers.
For the full scoop on these books, check out my library thing page of the 27 books I own
*I own two copies of this book. One was sent to me personally by Mr.Adams after a brief letter exchange, several years ago.

    As I sit and listen to the podcast featuring Mr. Roberts Adams, I decided to pile ALL the books I own by, or about him. I have 27 in total. In no particular order they are:-

    • West From the Columbia 
    • Turning Back
    • To Make it Home
    • Tree line [Hasselblad Award 2009]
    • Reinventing the West,[with Ansel Adams]
    • Our Lives Our Children
    • Notes to Friends
    • Gone?
    • Listening to the river
    • Sunlight Solitude Democracy Home…
    • Cottonwoods
    • What Can We Believe Where?*
    • Los Angeles Spring
    • Perfect Times Perfect Places
    • Summer Nights
    • This Day
    • I hear the leaves and love the light
    • The New West
    • Summer Nights, Walking
    • From the Missouri West
    • Commercial Residential [Landscapes Along the Colorado Front Range, 1968-1972]
    • The Architecture and Art of Early Hispanic Colorado
    • Denver
    • Prairie
    • Why People Photograph
    • Beauty in Photography, Essays in defence of traditional Values
    • Along Some Rivers.

    For the full scoop on these books, check out my library thing page of the 27 books I own

    *I own two copies of this book. One was sent to me personally by Mr.Adams after a brief letter exchange, several years ago.

  10. Artist Robert Adams, one of my greatest inspirations.

  11. I’m quite pleased with the way this typology is going.
  12. Quality doesn’t mean deep blacks and whatever tonal range. That’s not quality, that’s a kind of quality. The pictures of Robert Frank might strike someone as being sloppy—the tone range isn’t right and things like that—but they’re far superior to the pictures of Ansel Adams with regard to quality, because the quality of Ansel Adams, if I may say so, is essentially the quality of a postcard. But the quality of Robert Frank is a quality that has something to do with what he’s doing, what his mind is. It’s not balancing out the sky to the sand and so forth. It’s got to do with intention
  13. backdooratwork:

2014-03-06 08:21:02

Another new project stumbles forward.

    backdooratwork:

    2014-03-06 08:21:02

    Another new project stumbles forward.

  14. mybackstep:

2014-02-23 08:38:16

This project has moved forward and will continue to do so in fits and starts.

    mybackstep:

    2014-02-23 08:38:16

    This project has moved forward and will continue to do so in fits and starts.

  15. Make work that matters to you, that pushes you and the viewer to see the world in a new way. Make work that is in conversation with history, society, or with yourself. The Art in fine art Pho- tography is the most important piece of it all. Be bold and true to yourself.
    Hamidah Glasgow, Executive Director, The Center for Fine Art Photography